Star Trek: Let The World Slip

Star Trek: Let The World Slip

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Star Trek: Let The World Slip
Faneditor Name:
Tagline:
A re-cut, extended TOS episode!
Original Movie Title:
Franchise:
Fanedit Type:
Original Release Date:
1968
Original Running Time:
100
Fanedit Release Date:
Fanedit Running Time:
75
Time Cut:
30
Time Added:
5
Brief Synopsis:
An edit combining Star Trek: The Original episodes' 'For the World is Hollow and I have Touched the Sky' and 'The Paradise Syndrome' into one extended episode.
Intention:
This edit is based around the premise that the asteroids featured in both the original episodes, is in fact one singular asteroid, and thus this edit re-structures both episodes so that events from one lead into and run concurrently with the other.
After much thought, I reasoned that the only possible way I could join both episodes, would be for us to open with 'For The World...', and at the point in the episode where McCoy decides to stay on board the Yonada asteroid, for Kirk to continue with his mission to a) discover the life on the planet Yonada is destined to destroy, and b) thus attempt to deflect the asteroid. Kirk thus sets a course for, and runs into the events from 'The Paradise Syndrome'. Whilst McCoy remains on the asteroid, the events of 'The Paradise Syndrome' take place, with careful cutting of any footage featuring McCoy, in the latter. Spock's phasering of the asteroid in 'The Paradise Syndrome' may thus seem harsh, but it runs in line with Kirk's dialogue from 'For The World...', that if the asteroid cannot be deflected, it will have to be 'blast[ed]...out of space'.

In the opening minutes of 'For The World...' Spock references the planet that Yonada will accidentally destroy as Daran V, and he cites the population and how many days until impact. In this edit, Daran V is 'The Paradise Syndrome' planet, and I simply shorten Spock's references to 3 million population, and 96 days until impact, to make the planet, its population, and the deadline, more compatible with events in the latter episode.

A running theme in 'For The World...' is McCoy's terminal illness, and I needed to find a way, other than in the original episode (since Kirk would have no need to return to the asteroid if the obelisk safely deflected it), for him to be cured and return to duty. In this edit, on returning to the ship, Spock uploads intelligence files he recorded from inside the Obelisk, discovering that the race who built it were the Preservers, a super race with advanced technology and advanced medicine. With the advanced knowledge at hand, Kirk races back to Yonada, and beams down with Spock barely in time to cure McCoy. A sightly edited version of McCoy's farewell to Natira follows this.

I include a final scene in Kirk's quarters, borrowing the ending to 'Requiem for Methuselah', cutting out all references to that episode, and ending on Spock removing the painful memories from Kirk. To add a little touch, when Spock says "forget", I superimposed a brief clip of Miramanee moving away from Kirk (a reverse shot of the one in which she approaches him as he stands at the top of the obelisk, when they first meet), to symbolise Kirk's removal of her from his memories, along with the music used when Miramanee dies (which, in this cut, does not get used earlier).

Of course this edit cuts out the last third of 'For The World...' meaning that whilst the asteroid is now deflected planet-side, the people are still enslaved by the Oracle by the episode's ending. However, this is unavoidable, and as Spock even says in the original episode, getting involved on that level would have violated the Prime Directive, so I don't think it is too much to worry about. The people are still destined for their new home.

To maintain the belief that McCoy is living on Yonada concurrently with events happening in the second portion of the edit, I shift a trunated scene further into the edit, between McCoy and Natira, in which the former becomes a confirmed resident of the people, and he marries Natira.
Additional Notes:
The title 'Let The World Slip' comes from Shakespeare's 'The Taming of the Shrew', referring to letting the world slip away and escapism. Several TOS episodes used Shakespearean quotes as their title. Here, 'let the world slip' refers to: 1) Kirk and McCoy's falling in love and their desire to let the world (i.e. their previous lives) slip away 2) The Daran V paradise planet being left to slip away on its own innocence, despite the rest of the universe advancing 3) The Fabrini letting the Yonada world slip away to a new destination 4) The Yonada world being left be, left to slip away (which we leave it to do so at the episode's end)
Other Sources:
Additional dialogue from:
The Corbomite Manuever
All Our Yesterdays
The Way To Eden

Additional footage from:
Plato's Stepchildren
Requiem for Methuselah
Day of the Dove
The Tholian Web
Balance of Terror
Assignment: Earth
The Way To Eden
The Immunity Syndrome - background template for bridge viewscreen only

Additional music from:
Star Trek: The Original Series Soundtrack Collection

Additional sfx from:
Star Trek: Sound Effects
Release Information
MP4/M4V/MOV
Cuts and Additions:
The teaser now ends on a shot of both Kirk and McCoy. I always felt McCoy should have had the last shot before the fade out, as it was him with the illness, not Kirk. Since there's very little footage to play with, I came up with the best alternative I think was possible.
With the exception of three segments, all of the last third of 'For the World...', after the admiral orders Kirk to continue with his mission.
Kirk's line in response to Spock's concern that informing the people of Yonada they are on a spaceship would violate the Prime Directive. In this cut, Kirk and Spock leave Yonada to continue on with their mission without taking any action, so I feel any references to actions Kirk does not take in this cut, would serve simply to confuse viewers, so Kirk's line gets cut.
McCoy's sole, and Kirk's two references to the control room on the Yonada spaceship, since in this cut we do not see it.
All shots of McCoy in 'The Paradise Syndrome', including truncating two Enterprise scenes and removing one other between Spock and McCoy in the former's quarters. Some of Spock's dialogue is transferred to the final bridge scene.
Three pieces of dialogue spoken by Spock to McCoy regarding the Obelisk, are now presented as Spock's inner thoughts.
All references to the deflection point in 'The Paradise Syndrome'. In this cut, there is no set deflection point, since the Enterprise stumbles upon Yonada by chance.
When Kirk awakens in the Obelisk, his inner thoughts have been substituted for a second season library cue, and as Kirk exits the Obelisk, a shot of the Enterprise moving away from him is overlayed onto the main image, symbolising Kirk has lost his ship and his world.
A new short scene has been added during the latter half of the edit. On board the slow-running ship, Spock declares Kirk dead at a memorial service, using footage from 'The Tholian Web', 'Balance of Terror' and 'Assignment: Earth'.
Miramanee's exclamation 'You are a God!' to Kirk, in regards to getting inside the 'temple', has been replaced with the alternate audio from the episode's original 'Next Voyage' trailer, which I think has more impact in its delivery. Since we do not see Miramanee's mouth moving, there is no concern about lip synching.
New episode titles have been created, thus both episodes' original titles have been removed.
The closing credits of the Enterprise moving into the distance from 'Day of the Dove' are used in this edit, with the end music from 'The Paradise Syndrome'.
Several music cues have been substituted, adjusted or added, all from the Original Series.
Originally I thought it would not matter utilising both asteroid graphics. However, on viewing an early cut, I noted how vastly different both asteroids are, so I had to choose which to go with in the final cut. Whilst I would have preferred to use the Yonada version, as it better resembles a spaceship, in the end, apart from using one clip, I had to go with the asteroid from 'The Paradise Syndrome', since all the shots involving firing phasers and deflecting the asteroid were needed in the edit, and I only have the original material to play with.

Structure is as follows:
Teaser & 7 acts - each being between approx 5 & 15 mins
Teaser - as per the original from 'For the World...'
Act 1 - as above
Act 2 - as above
Act 3 - opens with 'For the World...' Act 3, bridging both episodes together, and ending on 'The Paradise Syndrome' teaser's ending.
Act 4 - as per the original 'The Paradise Syndrome', but ends with Kirk being given the medicine badge.
Act 5 - opens with the Enterprise racing back to the asteroid, and ends with the original halfway break from 'The Paradise Syndrome'.
Act 6 - as per the original Act 3 from 'The Paradise Syndrome', but ends on the people stoning Kirk and Miramanee, as I wanted the opening of the final act to be Spock beaming down.
Act 7 - opens with Spock beaming down to the planet, and ends with the final scene from 'Requiem for Methuselah'.

User reviews

1 reviews

Overall rating 
 
9.5
Audio/Video Quality 
 
10.0  (1)
Visual Editing 
 
8.0  (1)
Audio Editing 
 
7.0  (1)
Narrative 
 
10.0  (1)
Enjoyment 
 
10.0  (1)
Overall rating 
 
9.5
Audio/Video Quality 
 
10.0
Visual Editing 
 
8.0
Audio Editing 
 
7.0
Narrative 
 
10.0
Enjoyment 
 
10.0

Having watched the three part time travel edit put together by Warlord, I had faith in what he could do with this two-in-one edit of two vaugely connected Trek episodes, an asteroid is the connective issue used here, and the result is a somewhat mixed yet very entertaining story. On a narrative level it works quite well and the structure of the acts all do what his highly detailed change list conveys to the audience, so it works in concept.

On a technical level it is slightly mixed, with occasional hard audio cuts and some framerate pauses, it can be a little distracting, but frustration boils over more because you sort of have to point this out in a review, as someone who appreciates creativity on this level I wasn't taken out of any immersion, I was in awe at how well the editor's story is structured.

I definitely would recommend this edit, it is not perfect, but it has been handled by someone with expert narrative skills and neither episode feels like it gets in the way of one another. This is no frakenstien's monster, this is vintage Trek and you come away with more to ponder from it, like all the great Treks of yesterday provide.

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